Frequently Asked Questions

We have grouped our FAQ's into categories to better serve you and will be adding more information here as it becomes available. Still can't find answers to your questions? Contact us.

Video - Questions marked with this icon link to an answer in video format.

 

 

Taxes

 

When will property tax relief funded by slots occur?
Slots revenues were first used to expand the 2006 Property Tax and Rent Rebate (PTRR) program for senior citizens, widows/widowers 50 and over, and people with disabilities. The program expansion increased the income limit from $15,000 to $35,000 (which excludes half of Social Security income) for homeowners and raised the maximum rebate for both homeowners and renters from $500 to $650. Taxes paid in 2006 were the first to be rebated under the expanded program with the first checks sent out in July 2007. Each July, the Department of Revenue begins issuing rebate checks for taxes/rent paid in the preceding calendar year.
Beginning with the 2007 PTRR program, slots revenues are used to fund supplemental property tax rebates for residents of Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and Scranton, as well as homeowners in other areas of the Commonwealth having no more than $30,000 in household income, while paying more than 15 percent of their income in property taxes. The supplemental rebate represents a 50% increase over the standard rebate.
In addition, slots revenues are used to fund general school property tax relief. Each April 15, the Secretary of the Budget certifies the amount of revenue available for distribution as general school property tax relief and Philadelphia wage tax relief during the upcoming fiscal year. On April 15, 2009 the Secretary certified that $595 million was available for statewide property tax relief in fiscal year 2009-10. An additional $18.2 million was available to provide eligible school districts with Sterling Act Reimbursements. Together, this relief reduced school district property taxes by nearly $200 per household across the state. Philadelphia’s share of funding for broad-based tax relief - $86.3 million – was used to reduce the city’s wage taxes instead of property taxes.
School tax bills reflect the homestead and farmstead exclusions funded by slots as a separate line item.

 

Diversity

 

Does the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board (“PGCB”) certify potential minority and women owned business enterprises?

No, the PGCB accepts the certification of the Department of General Services (“DGS”). DGS has an expedited certification process in place whereby an MBE and/or MBE may obtain its certification within six weeks.

 

Is there a requirement that a minority business enterprise interested in providing construction services or any other type of service to one of the PGCB’s licensees be certified as a Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) or a Women Business Enterprise (WBE)?

No. There is no requirement that a vendor interested in doing business with a licensee be certified as a MBE or WBE. However, minority and women business enterprises are strongly encouraged to complete the certification process. The certification process will usually serve to increase the vendor’s marketability with the PGCB’s licensees.

 

What does the PGCB’s diversity officer look for when reviewing a company’s diversity plan for compliance with Section 1212 of Act 71?

The PGCB’s diversity officer takes the following factors into consideration when assessing a diversity plan: the existence of an equal employment opportunity/diversity statement; implementation procedures for the plan; dissemination procedures for the plan; complaint procedures; a human resources plan for employee recruitment, training, promotion and retention efforts; procurement and supplier utilization policies and procedures; construction utilization policies and procedures and certification by the CEO/President of the entity of his/her good faith intention to implement the diversity plan as submitted to the PGCB.

 

Are small companies with two to four employees required to provide the PGCB with a diversity plan?

Yes, in order to become a PGCB certified vendor the company must have a diversity plan. The PGCB’s diversity officer will assist any vendor with questions regarding the preparation of a diversity plan that fully satisfies the requirements set forth in Section 1212 of Act 71. For your review, sample diversity plans of certified vendors are available on this site.

 

How often are slot machine licensees and certified vendors required to update their diversity plans?

Slot machine licensees and certified vendors are required to provide the PGCB with an updated diversity plan on an annual basis.

 

Is it necessary to provide a statement regarding the company’s “complaint process” in the diversity plan if the company has never had an employee file a complaint alleging harassment or discrimination?

Yes, the company must provide a statement in its diversity plan regarding the company’s “complaint process” as it relates to harassment or discrimination irrespective of the fact that no employee has ever filed a complaint against the company.

 

Is it necessary to include a statement regarding the company’s commitment to diversity in it procurement process if the purchases made the company are limited to basic office supplies?

Yes, the company must provide a statement in its diversity plan regarding the entity’s commitment to diversity in the procurement process.

 

Hearings and Appeals

 

After I receive the letter telling me of the recommendation to deny my application, how many days do I have to request a hearing?

You have ten (10) days from the receipt of the letter to file your Hearing Request Form with the Board Clerk at:

Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board
Attn: Board Clerk
PO Box 69060
Harrisburg, PA 17106-9060

 

If I want to schedule a hearing and cannot find my Hearing Request Form, who do I contact?

You may schedule a hearing only by completing a Hearing Request Form. Hearing Request Forms are available on the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board’s website (gamingcontrolboard.pa.gov). Print a copy of the form and mail it to the Office of the Clerk at the address listed above or call the Board Clerk at (717) 265-7451 to request another form.

 

When will I have my hearing?

Immediately upon receipt of your Hearing Request Form, the Office of Hearings and Appeals will assign a hearing officer to manage your case and schedule a hearing date. Typically hearings are held two (2) to four (4) weeks after the Hearing Request Form is received. You will be notified of the date and time of your hearing at least ten (10) days before the day the hearing is to be held.

 

Where are the hearings held?

All hearings are conducted by a Hearing Officer from the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board’s Office of Hearings and Appeals located at:

2nd Floor, Strawberry Square
(At the top of the escalators by the food court)
Harrisburg, PA 17101 

However, you will be given the option of participating by videoconference from one of the Board’s outlying offices if one of those locations is closer to your home. You will be able to specify your choice of location on the Hearing Request Form and will be able to attend the hearing in person at the Board’s hearing offices in Harrisburg or by videoconference from the Conshohocken office, the Scranton Office or the Pittsburgh office.

The addresses for the outlying offices are as follows:

Conshohocken Office
Spring Mills Complex-Quaker Park Building
1001 E. Hector Street, 2nd Floor
Suite 230
Conshohocken, PA 19428

Scranton Office
409 Lackawanna Avenue
Oppenheim Building, 4th Floor
Scranton, PA 18503

Pittsburgh Office
* New Address Effective March 11th, 2013:
Foster Plaza 10, 4th Floor
680 Andersen Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15220

 

What do I do if I need to reschedule my hearing?

You must call the Office of Hearings and Appeals at (717) 265-7451 as soon as possible. Your request will only be granted if you provide good cause for the need to reschedule. The Hearing Officer assigned to your case will decide if you have shown good cause for a new hearing date. A representative of the Office of Hearings and Appeals will contact you within 24 hours of your request regarding the Hearing Officer’s decision. If your request to reschedule the hearing is denied you must attend the hearing. If you do not attend, the hearing will be held in your absence.

 

If I decide later that I no longer want a hearing, what do I do?

You must contact the Office of Hearings and Appeals directly at (717) 265-7451. You will then be required to sign a Waiver of your Request for a Hearing. This form will be sent to you by a Board employee. When you receive the form in the mail you must sign and return it in the self-addressed stamped envelope provided. The form can also be found on the Board’s website (gamingcontrolboard.pa.gov). Only after the Board Clerk receives the signed Waiver from you will your hearing be cancelled.

 

Do I need to hire an attorney to represent me?

While you certainly have the right to have an attorney represent you, you are not required to have an attorney at your hearing. If you choose to have an attorney, you do so at your own expense.

 

How long will the hearing last?

A hearing may last anywhere from fifteen minutes to two (2) hours or more, depending on the circumstances of your case.

 

What documents should I bring to the hearing?

You should bring all documentation relating to your qualifications to hold a gaming permit or non-gaming registration, or gaming service provider certification or registration, or other appropriate documents.

Suggested documentation may include, but is not limited to:

• permits/licenses from other gaming jurisdictions
• permits/licenses from any other Pennsylvania state agencies you believe to be relevant to your application
• documents regarding community service performed
• information regarding work history and job performance evaluations
• information regarding education levels completed
• documents regarding drug and /alcohol treatment programs completed (if applicable)
• documents regarding psychological/mental health treatment programs completed(if applicable)
• letters of recommendation written and signed by individuals with knowledge of your character

Please make copies of the documents you wish to rely upon during the hearing so that you can give a copy to the Hearing Officer and a copy to the Office of Enforcement Counsel (“OEC”) attorney.

 

Does anyone need to attend the hearing with me?

You are the only person required to attend the hearing. However, you may bring individuals with you who you would like to have testify on your behalf about your background and character or provide any other information relevant to your appeal.

 

Who else will participate in the hearing?

In addition to any attorney you may choose to hire and any witnesses that you may choose to bring with you to support your application and appeal, the Bureau of Investigations and Enforcement, which has recommended to the Bureau of Licensing that your application be denied, will be represented at the hearing by an OEC attorney. In addition, an agent from the Bureau of Investigations and Enforcement may be called as a witness by OEC counsel to give oral testimony concerning the issues involved in your case. OEC also has the right to call other witnesses they believe are necessary.

In addition, the Hearing Officer assigned to the case will participate. The Hearing Officer is the person who makes all pre-hearing decisions in the case, who presides over or directs the hearing and who issues a Report and Recommendation to the Board concerning your case. The Hearing Officer may not speak alone with any party in the case at any time. The Hearing Officer may only speak to a party when all other parties are present.

 

What can I expect at a hearing?

OEC counsel may request to meet with you before the beginning of the hearing. If you resolve the issues related to your application before your hearing, the attorney from OEC will put together with you a Proposed Settlement Agreement and ask you to sign it and a Waiver of Right to a Hearing Form.

If you and OEC counsel have not resolved the issues related to your application and a Proposed Settlement Agreement cannot be reached, your oral hearing will take place as scheduled.

The hearing is not as formal as a court hearing, but is structured so that each side has a fair opportunity to be heard. All witnesses giving testimony are under oath and the hearing is either stenographically recorded or tape recorded.

During the hearing, you can expect that the OEC attorney will provide evidence concerning your case first. OEC counsel may also have witnesses from Bureaus within the Gaming Control Board testify and present evidence. You will be given an opportunity to question each witness presented by OEC. Plan to use this time to ask relevant questions of each of those witnesses and about any documents presented by OEC that the witness may have used to provide testimony Also, when OEC counsel is presenting its case, you may be called as a witness and be asked questions by the OEC attorney.

At the end of the OEC’s presentation you will be asked to provide any information, documents or testimony you wish to provide to the Hearing Officer. You should be prepared to present documents, give testimony under oath and present evidence you believe shows your qualifications to hold a gaming employee permit or non-gaming employee registration. When you are presenting on your case you will be able to have witnesses testify and introduce new facts and documentary evidence. Your witnesses may also be cross examined by OEC counsel just as you were permitted to question the witnesses provided by OEC.

Throughout the hearing, the Hearing Officer may also ask questions of you and any other witness.

After both sides have had the opportunity to present their testimony and evidence, the Hearing Officer will give you and OEC counsel the opportunity to make a closing argument and file a brief in support of your position. Both are optional. The purpose of both is to persuade the Hearing Officer to decide in either your favor or in favor of the OEC.

 

What happens when the hearing is over?

Within approximately three (3) to four (4) weeks you will receive a Report and Recommendation from the Hearing Officer, by first class mail, which will outline the Hearing Officer’s decision and the reasons for the decision.

 

If I do not agree with the Hearing Officer’s decision, what can I do?

If you disagree with the Hearing Officer’s Report and Recommendation you have fifteen (15) days from the date of the Report and Recommendation to file Exceptions with the Clerk to the Board. Your exceptions must be in writing, state clearly what it is that you object to and include the parts of the record where the basis of the objections can be found. You should also include any supporting legal arguments. A sample exceptions form can be found on the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board’s website at (gamingcontrolboard.pa.gov). Your Exceptions must be filed with the Board Clerk by mailing them to:

Attn: Board Clerk
PO Box 69060
Harrisburg, PA 17106-9060
 

Your Exceptions must also be served on the OEC counsel by mailing the exceptions to:

Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board
Attn: Office of Enforcement Counsel
P.O. Box 69060
Harrisburg, PA 17106-9060

 

What happens after I file my exceptions?

The Board’s Clerk will forward your Exceptions, any response to your Exceptions from OEC, the Hearing Officer’s Report and Recommendation and the full evidentiary record of the hearing to the Board for its review. The Board will then issue its final order after consideration of your Exceptions, the Hearing Officer’s Report and Recommendation and the full record. You will receive a copy of the Board’s final decision by first class mail.

 

What happens after I receive a final decision from the Board?

After you receive a final decision from the Board and if you disagree with the Board’s decision, you have the right to file an appeal with the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania Rule of Appellate Procedure 1512(a)(1) provides that you have thirty (30) days from the date of the Board’s decision to file your appeal with the Court.

 

Licensing

 

Who does the PGCB license?
  • Casino facilities, manufacturers, suppliers, manufacturer designees, gaming service providers
  • Principals: Owners, officers, directors, etc.
  • Key employees: General managers, department heads, etc.
  • Gaming level 2 employees: Table game managers, shift supervisors, promotional play supervisors, etc.
  • Gaming employees: Cage cashiers, dealers, slot attendants, etc.
  • Non-gaming employees: Cocktail servers, bartenders, janitorial personnel, valet parkers, etc.

 

Enterprise Licensing

 

How do I apply for a slot machine license?

Applications for a slot machine license can be found under the Licensure section of the website. Applications for a slot machine license are only allowed to be submitted during “application filing windows” as prescribed by the Board.

 

How long does it take for a principal/key employee application to be acted on by the Board?

An individual’s application can take various lengths of time from receipt to Board action as numerous factors can affect the process.

 

When is my renewal application due?

All license types are required to sub mit their renewal applications 2 months prior to the date of the expiration of their license.

 

Can Key Employees keep their license or credential if they resign from their current employer?

A Key employee license is portable, a temporary credential is not. If a licensed key employee is offered a position by another licensed gaming entity, his or her key employee license can be used so long as the Gaming Control Board is notified of the hiring by the Licensed Entity. If the key employee is in a pending status at the time of separation and seeks employment at another licensed entity, the employee will need to submit a new Multi-Jurisdictional Personal History Disclosure and Pennsylvania Supplement Form through the new employer.

 

I have been promoted from a gaming employee to a key employee, do I have to pay the full application fee for a key employee or just pay the difference between the two application fees?

The full application fee is required. Once an application is submitted to the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board, the fee associated with the application must be submitted.

 

How do I submit foreign taxes requested in my application?

All taxes are to be separated by year whether local, state, or foreign. An English translation should accompany any forms written in a foreign language.

 

How should I format information on CD?

Please refer to the CD formatting requirements found on our website under the Licensure Tab (Applications/License Applications Home). You may also use the following link: http://www.pgcb.state.pa.us/files/licensure/applications/Formatting_Requirements_for_the_Submission_of_Applications-Documents_on_CD.pdf.

 

The application requires me to provide copies of my tax returns, what if I do not have a copy of one or more of my tax returns?

You will need to contact the taxing authority for specific instructions on how to obtain copies of your tax returns. Listed below are links to these topics from the IRS and the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue.

Internal Revenue Service (IRS) http://www.irs.gov/faqs/faq/0,,id=199557,00.html

Pennsylvania Department of Revenue: https://revenue-pa.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/463/kw/request%20return%20copy/related/1

 

Gaming Employee Permits

 

What jobs require a gaming employee permit?

Generally, a gaming employee permit is required for employees of a licensed facility whose job duties require day-to-day interaction with gaming patrons, gaming equipment or gaming revenues as part of the gaming operation. Positions that require gaming employee permits include, but are not limited to auditors, cage cashiers, dealers, player services representatives, security guards, slot hosts, slot technicians, supervisors and surveillance agents.

A gaming employee permit is required for employees of a licensed manufacturer, manufacturer’s designee, supplier or gaming service provider who work on the gaming floor of a licensed facility, in a restricted area and/or work with gaming or associated equipment.

 

Will I become a state employee if I am hired by a casino?

No. Casinos are private companies that are regulated by the state.

 

If I have bad credit or a previous bankruptcy, will I be denied a gaming permit?

Reviewing your credit is part of the background investigation, but it is not the only factor used when making recommendations for approval or denial.

 

I have a felony on my record. Will this prevent me from getting a permit?

Under the law, gaming employees are not permitted to have a felony conviction within the past 15 years. The type and severity of any felony beyond 15 years ago will be considered when making recommendations for approval and denial.

 

Why do you do a background investigation on each gaming applicant?

A background investigation for each gaming applicant is required by state law in an effort to protect the integrity of gaming in Pennsylvania.

 

If I am a state employee, can I work for a casino?

Yes, but you should check with your agency human resources office to ensure no conflict exists.

 

Are gaming employees permitted to play slot machines or table games in Pennsylvania?

Gaming employees who are employed by a casino are permitted to play slot machines and table games in Pennsylvania but not at the casino where they are employed.

Gaming employees who are employed by a manufacturer, manufacturer’s designee, supplier or gaming related gaming service provider are permitted to play slot machines and table games in Pennsylvania but not while at a casino in the performance of their job duties.

 

Are gaming employees permitted to bet on horse races in Pennsylvania?

Yes. However you should check with your casino human resources office to ensure you are not prohibited by corporate policy from betting on horse races.

 

How old do I have to be to obtain a gaming permit?

You must be 18 years old to be employed by a casino.

 

Am I required to be bonded before I apply for a gaming permit?

Although the casino you work for may require you to be bonded, the PGCB does not require you to be bonded to apply for a permit.

 

Do I have to have a job offer before applying for a gaming permit?

Yes. A job offer is required by state law.

 

If I am terminated or resign, what happens to my gaming permit?

Depending on the reason for your termination, the PGCB will allow you to keep your permit to gain employment at another casino in Pennsylvania.

 

Am I able to play the lottery if I am employed with a licensed facility?

Yes. However you should check with your casino human resources office to ensure you are not prohibited by corporate policy from purchasing lottery tickets where you are employed.

 

How much of my criminal history am I required to disclose?

You must attempt to disclose all of your criminal history regardless of what it is or when it happened.

 

How long do I have to wait to play slot machines or table games at the casino where I used to work as a gaming employee?

You must wait 30 days from your last date of employment before playing slot machines or table games at the casino where you used to work.

 

Non-Gaming Employee Registrations

 

What jobs require a non-gaming employee registration?

Generally, a non-gaming employee registration is required for employees of a licensed facility whose job duties require the employee to be in a gaming or restricted area but that do not require day-to-day interaction with gaming equipment or gaming revenues. Positions that require non-gaming employee registrations include, but are not limited to cocktail servers, bartenders, janitorial personnel and valet parkers.

A non-gaming employee registration is required for employees of a gaming service provider who work on the gaming floor of a licensed facility in a position that does not require the employees to work with gaming or associated equipment other than exterior cleaning.

 

Will I become a state employee if I am hired by a casino?

No. Casinos are private companies that are regulated by the state.

 

If I have bad credit or a previous bankruptcy, will I be denied a non-gaming registration?

No. Non-gaming applicants are not required to provide credit information with their application.

 

I have a felony on my record. Will this prevent me from getting a registration?

The type and severity of any felony will be considered when making recommendations for approval and denial.

 

Why do you do a background investigation on each non-gaming applicant?

A background investigation for each non-gaming applicant is required by PGCB regulations in an effort to protect the integrity of gaming in Pennsylvania.

 

If I am a state employee, can I work for a casino?

Yes, but you should check with your agency human resources office to ensure no conflict exists.

 

Are non-gaming employees permitted to play slot machines or table games in Pennsylvania?

Yes, but not at the casino where they are employed.

 

How long do I have to wait to play slot machines or table games at the casino where I used to work as a non-gaming employee?

You must wait 30 days from your last date of employment before playing slot machines or table games at the casino where you used to work.

 

Are non-gaming employees permitted to bet on horse races in Pennsylvania?

Yes. However you should check with your casino human resources office to ensure you are not prohibited by corporate policy from betting on horse races.

 

How old do I have to be to obtain a non-gaming registration?

You must be 18 years old to be employed by a casino.

 

Do I have to have a job offer before applying for a non-gaming registration?

No, but if you do not have a job offer, you must be sponsored by a casino before completing the application.

 

If I am terminated or resign, what happens to my non-gaming registration?

Depending on the reason for your termination, the PGCB will allow you to keep your registration to gain employment at another casino in Pennsylvania.

 

Am I able to play the lottery if I am employed with a licensed facility?

Yes. However you should check with your casino human resources office to ensure you are not prohibited by corporate policy from purchasing lottery tickets where you are employed.

 

How much of my criminal history am I required to disclose?

You must attempt to disclose all of your criminal history regardless of what it is or when it happened.

 

Credentials

 

What should I do if my credential has been lost or stolen?

Report it to your Human Resources office and complete the following steps to request a duplicate credential:

Requesting a Duplicate Credential:
1. Contact the Human Resources office at the facility in which you are employed to obtain a Duplicate Credential Request Form.
2. Send the completed form and a check or money order payment of $25 made payable to the “Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board” to:
Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board
Special Services Unit, Bureau of Licensing
303 Walnut Street, 5th Floor, Verizon Tower
Harrisburg, PA 17101
3. To continue to work during this period, you will need to report to the PGCB’s Casino Enforcement Office located at your facility to obtain an emergency credential valid for up to 72 hours. Your duplicate credential will be sent to your Human Resources office in approximately two business days after receipt of the form and payment.

 

Can I request a new badge to reflect a name change before my current credential expires?

Yes. It is recommended that you request a duplicate badge to reflect a name change due to marriage, divorce, etc. Follow the above procedure for requesting a duplicate credential. There is no fee required for a duplicate badge due to a name change. Proof of ID must be attached to the duplicate credential request form (ex: copy of updated Social Security card, marriage certificate, court order or driver’s license).

NOTE: Your Human Resources office must contact the PGCB BEFORE you have your new signature captured. A copy of the duplicate credential request form and proof of ID must be presented to the Pennsylvania State Police when the new signature is captured. Your employer will assist you with the filing of an amendment to your PGCB application to reflect your new name.

 

What should I do if my credential contains incorrect information?

Provide your Human Resources Office with the correct information as soon as possible. Your Human Resources office will then contact a PGCB Licensing Analyst to verify the information that was entered on your application. If this information was entered incorrectly on your application, you will need to file an amendment to your application before a new credential can be issued. Your Human Resources Office will assist you with the filing of an amendment and requesting a new credential.

 

Gaming Service Providers

 

What is a gaming service provider?

A gaming service provider is defined as a person who provides non-gaming related goods or services to a slot machine licensee/applicant.

 

What is a registered gaming service provider?

A person or entity must file a gaming service provider registration application if the total dollar amount of business is or will be greater than $100,000 but less than $500,000 with any single or multiple slot machine licensee(s)/applicant(s) within a consecutive 12 month period. Registered gaming service provider’s employees can provide services in a restricted area or on the gaming floor after completing a gaming or non-gaming employee application and receiving the appropriate credential.

 

What is the difference between a sponsored registered gaming service provider and un-sponsored registered gaming service provider?

A sponsored registered gaming service provider must submit its application to the slot machine licensee/applicant with which it has an agreement to provide services. An un-sponsored registered gaming service provider may submit its application directly to the PGCB without having an existing agreement to provide services to a slot machine licensee/applicant.

 

What are the fees associated with becoming a sponsored or un-sponsored registered gaming service provider?

A non-refundable deposit of $500 must be submitted with the application. The applicant is also responsible for the cost of the background investigation and a registration fee of $2,000.

 

What is a certified gaming service provider?

A person or entity must file a gaming service provider certification application if the total dollar amount of business is or will be greater than $500,000 with a single or multiple slot machine licensee(s)/applicant(s) within a consecutive 12 month period. Certified gaming service providers employees can provide services in a restricted area or on the gaming floor after completing a gaming or non-gaming employee application and receiving the appropriate credential.

 

What are the fees associated with becoming a certified gaming service provider?

The following forms and their corresponding application fees are listed below. Investigation costs could exceed the amount of these fees.

Gaming service provider Certification Application and Disclosure Information Form - $1,500
Gaming service provider Certification Form – Private Holding Company – No fee
Pennsylvania Personal History Disclosure Form - $500
Gaming Employee Application and Disclosure Information Form - $350
Non-Gaming Employee Registration Form - $60

The gaming service provider must also pay a $4,000 certification fee prior to the issuance of its certification.

 

What is the difference between gaming and non-gaming employees who work for a gaming service provider?

A gaming employee permit is required for employees of a registered, certified or publicly traded corporation gaming service provider who work on the gaming floor of a licensed facility, in a restricted area and/or work with gaming or associated equipment including the movement of slot machines, or the installation of signage attached to slot machines.

A non-gaming employee registration is required for employees of a registered, certified or publicly traded corporation gaming service provider who work on the gaming floor of a licensed facility in a position that does not require the employees to work with gaming or associated equipment other than exterior cleaning.

 

When may a gaming service provider begin providing services to a slot machine licensee or applicant?

Once the PGCB is in receipt of a completed application package and all tax statuses are compliant. The gaming service providers will be added to the authorized gaming service provider list located on the Board’s website. Once a gaming service provider is added to the authorized list it may begin providing services.

 

What happens to a gaming service provider application once it is received by the PGCB?

The application is assigned a docket number and will be listed as an “unauthorized gaming service provider”. The application is assigned to a licensing analyst. The analyst will send a letter of acknowledgement to the attention of the contact listed for the gaming service provider. This letter will make a request for items to cure any deficiencies in the application or its attachments.

Once the application is deemed complete, it is transmitted to our Bureau of Investigation and Enforcement for investigation. After an investigation of the gaming service provider, the application goes before the Board for approval or denial.

If approved, the gaming service provider will be issued its certification or registration after it has paid any outstanding fees.

 

Once a gaming service provider’s application is approved by the PGCB, how long does the gaming service provider’s registration or certification last?

A gaming service provider, once approved, will be registered or certified for a period of four years. Prior to the expiration of its registration or certification, the gaming service provider will be required to submit a renewal application in order to continue doing business with Pennsylvania slot machine licensees.

 


Compulsive & Problem Gambling

 

Self-Exclusion Program

What is Self-Exclusion?

Self-Exclusion is a process that allows a person to request to be banned from all legalized gaming activities and to be prohibited from collecting any winnings, recovering any losses or accepting complimentary gifts or services or any other thing of value at any licensed facility. Self-exclusion only applies to the gaming floor of the licensed gaming facilities in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. For more information, you can download a brochure on the process.

Video Click here for a video answer to this question.

 

How do I get placed on the self-exclusion list?

A person may have his or her own name placed on the self-exclusion list by submitting, in person, a completed request for self exclusion to the:

Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board
Office of Compulsive and Problem Gambling
303 Walnut Street, Strawberry Square
Verizon Tower/5th Floor
Harrisburg, PA 17101

Call the Office of Compulsive and Problem Gaming Enforcement at 717-346-8300 for additional approved locations.

 

May I mail the self-exclusion request to one of the PGCB offices?

No. The person filing the request for self-exclusion must apply in person to the PGCB offices in Harrisburg or other approved locations to be photographed. You may be fingerprinted and will be required to present a government-issued photo identification containing the person’s signature and photograph. Call the office of Compulsive and Problem Gambling Enforcement at 717-346-8300 for additional approved locations.

 

Can I place a family member with a gambling problem on the list?

No. A person cannot place another person on the self-exclusion list. Placement on the list is entirely voluntary and must be done by the individual seeking exclusion.

 

What information must I provide?

(1) Name, including any aliases or nicknames.
(2) Date of birth.
(3) Address of current residence.
(4) Telephone number of current residence.
(5) Social Security number, when voluntarily provided in accordance with section 7 of the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. § 552a).
(6) Physical description of the person, including height, weight, gender, hair color, eye color and any other physical characteristic that may assist in the identification of the person.
(7) Government-issued photo identification such as driver’s license or passport.

Click for a copy of the self-exclusion request and instructions. PDF

 

How long will I be on the self-exclusion list?

The person filing the request for self-exclusion may request to be excluded from gaming activities for one of the following: One year (12 months); Five years; or Lifetime.

 

Can my name be removed from the self-exclusion list?

Self-exclusions for 1 or 5 years remain in effect until the self-excluded person requests removal from the PGCB’s self-exclusion list. A person may, upon the expiration of the period of self-exclusion, request to be removed from the self-exclusion list by submitting, in person, a completed request for removal. A person submitting a request for removal from the self-exclusion list shall be required to present a valid government-issued photo identification credential containing the person’s signature and a photograph.

 

What will happen after I sign up for self-exclusion?

Licensed facilities must refuse wagers from and deny gaming privileges to any self-excluded person; deny check cashing privileges, player club membership, complimentary goods and services, junket participation and other similar privileges and benefits to any self-excluded person; ensure that self-excluded persons do not receive junket solicitations, targeted mailings, telemarketing promotions, player club materials or other promotional materials relating to gaming activities at its licensed facility; and may exclude self-excluded persons from their properties in other jurisdictions.

After a person is placed on the self-exclusion list, a licensed facility must refuse to accept the person’s wagers, will ask the person to leave the gaming floor and the person may be arrested for trespass. A self-excluded person who has gambled while on the self-exclusion list may not collect in any manner or in any proceeding any winnings or recover any losses arising as a result of any gaming activity for the entire period of time that the person is on the self-exclusion list. Any winnings issued to, found on or about or redeemed by a self-excluded person shall be remitted to the PGCB and deposited into the Compulsive and Problem Gambling Treatment Fund.